Learn to hack online – h4x0rz and pros

Removing these videos hinders defenders much more significantly than it impairs the attackers.

Over the past week, there has been a minor furore over YouTube’s decision to block certain “hacking” videos.  According to The Register, the policy first appeared on the 5th April 2019:

“Instructional hacking and phishing: Showing users how to bypass secure computer systems or steal user credentials and personal data.”

Now, I can see why they’ve done this: it’s basic backside-covering.  YouTube – and many or the other social media outlets – come under lots of pressure from governments and other groups for failing to regulate certain content.  The sort of content to which such groups most typically object is fake news, certain pornography or child abuse material: and quite rightly.  I sympathise, sometimes, with the social media giants as they try to regulate a tidal wave of this sort or material – and I have great respect for those employees who have to view some of it – having written policies to ban this sort of thing may not deter many people from posting it, but it does mean that the social media companies have a cast-iron excuse for excising it when they come across it.

Having a similar policy to ban these types of video feels, at first blush, like the same sort of thing: you can point to your policy when groups complain that you’re hosting material that they don’t like – “those dangerous hacking videos”.

Hacking[3] videos are different, though.  The most important point is that they have a  legitimate didactic function: in other words, they’re useful for teaching.  Nor do I think that there’s a public outcry from groups wanting them banned.  In fact, they’re vital for teaching and learning about IT security, and most IT security professionals and organisations get that.  Many cybersecurity techniques are difficult to understand properly when presented as theoretical attacks and, more importantly, they are difficult to defend against without detailed explanation and knowledge.  This is the point: these instructional videos are indispensable tools to allow people not just to understand, but to invent, apply and maintain defences and mitigations against known attacks.  IT security is hard, and we need access to knowledge to help us defeat the Bad Folks[tm] who we know are out there.

“But these same Bad Folks[tm] will see these videos online and use them against us!” certain people will protest.  Well, yes, some will.  But if we ban and wipe them from widely available social media platforms, where they are available for legitimate users to study, they will be pushed underground, and although fewer people may find them, the nature of our digital infrastructure means that the reach of those few people is still enormous.

And there is an imbalance between attackers and defenders: this move exacerbates it.  Most defenders look after small numbers of systems, but most serious attackers have the ability to go after many, many systems.  By pushing these videos away from places that many defenders can learn from them, we have removed the opportunity for those who most need access to this information, whilst, at the most, raising the bar for those against who we are trying to protect.

I’m sure there are numbers of “script-kiddy” type attackers who may be deterred or have their access to these videos denied, but they are significantly less of a worry than motivated, resourced attackers: the ones that haunt many IT security folks’ worst dreams.  We shouldn’t use a mitigation against (relatively) low-risk attackers remove our ability to defend against higher risk attackers.

We know that sharing of information can be risky, but this is one of those cases in which the risks can be understood and measured against others, and it seems like a pretty simple calculation this time round.  To be clear: the (good) many need access to these videos to protect against the (malicious) few.  Removing these videos hinders the good much more significantly than it impairs the malicious, and we, as a community, should push back against this trend.


1 – it’s pronounced “few-ROAR-ray”.  And “NEEsh”.  And “CLEEK”[2].

2 – yes, I should probably calm down.

3 – I’d much rather refer to these as “cracking” videos, but I feel that we probably lost that particular battle about 20 years ago now.

Author: Mike Bursell

Long-time Open Source and Linux bod, distributed systems security, etc.. Now employed by Red Hat.

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