Vint Cerf’s “game changer”

I’m really proud to be involved with a movement which I believe can change the way we do computing.

Today’s article is a little self-indulgent, but please bear with me, as I’m a little excited. Vint Cerf is one of a small handful of people who have a claim to being called “greats”. He’s one of the co-developers of TCP/IP protocol with Bob Kahn in 1974, and has been working on technology – much of it pretty cool technology – since then. I turned 50 recently, and if I’d achieved half of what he had by his 50th birthday, I’d be feeling more accomplished than I do right now! As well as his work in technology, he’s also an advocate for accessibility, which is something which is also dear to my heart.

What does this have to do with Alice, Eve and Bob – a security blog? Well, last week, Dark Reading[1], an influential technology security site, published a commentary piece by Cerf under its “Cloud” heading: Why Confidential Computing is a Game Changer. I could hardly have been more pleased: this is an area which I’m very excited about, and which the Enarx project, of which I’m co-founder, addresses. The Enarx project is part of the Confidential Computing Consortium (mentioned in Cerf’s article), a Linux Foundation project to increase use of confidential computing through open source projects.

So, what is confidential computing? Cerf describes it as “a breakthrough technology that encrypts data in use, while it is being processed”. He goes on to give a good description of the technology, noting that Google (his employer[2]) has recently released a product using confidential computing. Google is actually far from the first cloud service provider to do this, but it’s only fair that Cerf should mention his employer’s services from time to time: I’m going to forgive him, given how enthusiastic he is about the technology more generally. He describes it as a transformational technology which “will and should be a part of every enterprise cloud deployment”.

I agree, and it’s really exciting to see such a luminary embracing the possibilities the confidential computing presents. For those readers who aren’t aware of what it is, confidential computing allows you to keep data and processes secret in the cloud, on private servers, on the Edge, IoT, etc. – even from administrators, hypervisors and the host kernel. It uses TEEs – Trusted Execution Environments – to protect the confidentiality and integrity of the workloads (application, programs) that you want to run. If you’re not sure you trust your cloud provider, if your regulatory body won’t let you run your applications in certain places, if you want to deploy to machines which are vulnerable to attack – physical or logical – then TEEs and confidential computing can help.

You can find a more information in some of my articles:

You can always visit the Confidential Computing Consortium[3] or visit the Enarx project (links above): all of our code and documentation is open, and we’d love to see you. I’m really proud to be involved with – in fact, deeply embedded in – a movement which I believe can change the way we do computing. And really excited that someone like Vint Cerf agrees.


1 – I have no affiliation with Dark Reading, though I do recommend it to readers of this blog.

2- neither do I have any affiliation with Google or Alphabet, its parent!

3 – I am, however, a member of both the Governing Board and the Technical Advisory Council of the Confidential Computing Consortium. I’m also the Treasurer.

Author: Mike Bursell

Long-time Open Source and Linux bod, distributed systems security, etc.. Now employed by Red Hat. マイク・バーゼル: オープンソースとLinuxに長く従事。他にも分散セキュリティシステムなども手がける。現在Red Hatのチーフセキュリティアーキテクト

2 thoughts on “Vint Cerf’s “game changer””

  1. I really enjoyed “Bringing your emotions to work.” It was quite insightful and well written. Thank you for reminding us there’s more going on behind the “work” curtain.

    Like

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