7 steps to a (bad) tech demo

Give the demo, look condescending, go home.

I’m currently involved with putting together a demo to show off the amazing progress we’ve made with Enarx recently. I’ve watched – and given – quite a few demos in my time, and I considered writing a guide to presenting a good demo. But then I thought: why? Demos should be about showing how clever we are, not about the audience – that’s pretty clear from most of the ones I’ve seen – so I decided to write a guide to a what many audiences would consider a bad demo, in other words, the type that most of us in IT are most practised at. Follow this guide, and you can be pretty certain that you will join the ranks of know-it-all, disdainful techies who are better than their audiences and have no interest in engaging with lower, less intelligent beings such as colleagues, user groups or potential customers. If you’re in marketing, sales, documentation or another function, you can still learn from this guide, and use it as part of your journey as you strive to achieve the arrogant sanctimoniousness which we techies cultivate and for which we are (in)famous. Luckily, many demos already exist which exhibit these characteristics, so you shouldn’t need to look far to find examples.

1. Assume your audience is you

You only need one demo, because everybody who matters will come from the same background as you: ultra-technical. You will, of course, be using a terminal, which means text commands to drive the demo. Don’t pander to lesser mortals by expanding parameters, for instance: why use df --all --human-readable --portability /home/mbursell/ when df -ahT ~/ is available and will save you space and time. If you really must provide graphical output (sometimes even hard-core techies have to work with GUIs, to their intense annoyance and disappointment), ensure that you’re using non-standard colours and icons. Why not use a smiley-face emoji for the “irretrievable delete” function or a thumbs-up icon for “cancel”? And you get extra points if you use a browser which still supports the <blink> tag: everybody’s favourite from the mid-90s.

Your audience shouldn’t need any context before the demo, either: if they’ve come to hear you speak, all you’re doing is giving them an update on exactly how far you have come – in other words, how clever you are. Find ways to exhibit that, and they’ll be impressed by your expertise and intelligence, which is what demos are for in the first place.

2. Don’t check it works

Your demo will, of course, work perfectly. Every time. Which means that there’s no need to check it just before delivering it. In fact, you might as well make a few last tweaks just beforehand – preferably without saving the “last good state”. Everyone will be amused if anything goes wrong – and if it does, it absolutely won’t be your fault. Here’s a list of useful things/people to blame if anything does happen:

  • the conference wifi (more difficult if you’re presenting virtually)
  • the VPN (no need to specify what VPN, or even if you’re using one)
  • other developers (who you can accuse of making last minute changes)
  • the Cloud Service Provider (again, no need to specify which one, or even if you’re using one)
  • DNS
  • certificate expiry
  • neutrinos
  • the marketing department.

3. Use small fonts and icons

Assume that everyone watching your demo:

  1. has perfect eyesight
  2. has perfect colour perception
  3. is sufficiently close to the projected image to see it (physical demo)
  4. is viewing on a screen as large as yours (online)
  5. is viewing on a screen at equal resolution to yours (online)
  6. has sufficient bandwidth that everything displays quickly and clearly enough for them to be able to see (online)
  7. can read and decipher unfamiliar text, commands, icons, obscure diagrams and dread sigils at least as quickly as you can display – and then hide – them.

4. Don’t explain

As noted above, anybody who is worthy of viewing the demo that you have put together should be immediately able to understand any context that is relevant, including any assumptions that you have made when creating the demo. “Obviously, I’ve created this WebAssembly binary directly from the Rust source file with the release flag, which means that we get good portability and type safety but decent on-the-wire speed and encryption time” is more than enough detail. You should probably have gone with something shorter like: “here’s an ls -al of the .wasm file. It’s cross-platform, safe and quick. Compiled with cargo +nightly build --release --wasm32-wasi, obviously.” Who needs a long and boring-to-deliver explanation of why you chose WebAssembly to allow users to run their applications on multiple different types of system, and the design and build decisions you made to reduce loading time over the network? No-one you care about, certainly.

5. Be very quick or very slow

This important point is related to several of the ones before. If you’ve been paying attention, you’ll know that there’s no good reason to worry about your audience and whether they’re following along, because if they’re the right type of audience (basically, they’re you), then they will already understand what’s going on. You can therefore speak as fast as you like, and whether you’re speaking their first language or not, they should pick up enough to appreciate the brilliance of the demo (in other words, your brilliance).

There is an alternative, of course, which is to speak really slowly. This should never be because you’re allowing your audience to pay attention and catch up however, but instead because you’re going into extreme detail about every single aspect of your demo, from the choice of your compilation options (see above) to the font family you use in your (many) terminals. This isn’t boring: it’s about you and your choices, so it’s interesting (to anyone who matters – see above).

6. Don’t record the demo

Your demo will work first time (unless you’re hit by problems caused by someone or something else – see 2 above), so there’s no need to record it, is there? What is more, anyone who is sufficiently interested in you, your project and your demo will attend in real-time, so there’s no need to record it for late-comers or for people to watch later. You’ll have made lots of changes within the next couple of weeks anyway, so what’s the point?

7. Don’t answer questions

Demos are for you to tell people about your project, and about you. They are not excuses for postulants to ask their questions of you. Questions generally fall into three types, none of which are of any interest to you:

  1. Stupid questions which betray how little an audience member understands about your demo. This is their fault, as they not clever enough to get what you’re doing. Ignore.
  2. Annoying questions which would be clear if people paid enough attention. These may be questions which are relevant to the demo, but which should be obvious to anyone who has done sufficient research into your work. Why should you clarify your work for lazy people? Ignore.
  3. Dangerous questions which point out possible mistakes or “improvements” to what you’ve done. You know best – you’re not showing a demo to get suggestions, but in order to expose your expertise. Ignore.

Conclusion

You are brilliant. Your demo is brilliant. Anybody who doesn’t see that is at fault, and it’s not your job to make their lives easier. Give the demo, look condescending, go home.

Author: Mike Bursell

Long-time Open Source and Linux bod, distributed systems security, etc.. Now employed by Red Hat. マイク・バーゼル: オープンソースとLinuxに長く従事。他にも分散セキュリティシステムなども手がける。現在Red Hatのチーフセキュリティアーキテクト

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