Top 5 resolutions for security folks – 2018

Yesterday, I wrote some jokey resolutions for 2018 – today, as it’s a Tuesday, my regular day for posts, I decided to come up with some real ones.

1 – Embrace the open

I’m proud to have been using Linux[1] and other open source software for around twenty years now.  Since joining Red Hat in 2016, and particularly since I started writing for Opensource.com, I’ve become more aware of other areas of open-ness out there, from open data to open organisations.  There are still people out there who are convinced that open source is less secure than proprietary software.  You’ll be unsurprised to discover that I disagree.  I encourage everyone to explore how embracing the open can benefit them and their organisations.

2 – Talk about risk

I’m convinced that we talk too much about security for security’s sake, and not about risk, which is what most “normal people” think about.  There’s education needed here as well: of us, and of others.  If we don’t understand the organisations we’re part of, and how they work, we’re not going to be able to discuss risk sensibly.  In the other direction, we need to be able to talk about security a bit, in order to explain how it will mitigate risk, so we need to learn how to do this in a way that informs our colleagues, rather than alienating them.

3 – Think about systems

I don’t believe that we[2] talk enough about systems.  We spend a lot of our time thinking about functionality and features, or how “our bit” works, but not enough about how all the bits fit together. I don’t often link out to external sites or documents, but I’m going to make an exception for NIST special publication 800-160 “Systems Security Engineering: Considerations for a Multidisciplinary Approach in the Engineering of Trustworthy Secure Systems”, and I particularly encourage you to read Appendix E “Roles, responsibilities and skills: the characteristics and expectations of a systems security engineer”.  I reckon this is an excellent description of the core skills and expertise required for anyone looking to make a career in IT security.

4 – Examine the point of conferences

I go to a fair number of conferences, both as an attendee and as a speaker – and also do my share of submission grading.  I’ve written before about how annoyed I get (and I think others get) by product pitches at conferences.  There are many reasons to attend the conferences, but I think it’s important for organisers, speakers and attendees to consider what’s most important to them.  For myself, I’m going to try to ensure that what I speak about is what I think other people will be interested in, and not just what I’m focussed on.  I’d also highlight the importance of the “hallway track”: having conversations with other attendees which aren’t necessarily directly related to the specific papers or talks. We should try to consider what conferences we need to attend, and which ones to allow to fall by the wayside.

5 – Read outside the IT security discipline

We all need downtime.  One way to get that is to read – on an e-reader, online, on your phone, magazines, newspapers or good old-fashioned books.  Rather than just pick up something directly related to work, choose something which is at least a bit off the beaten track.  Whether it’s an article on a topic to do with your organisation’s business,  a non-security part of IT[3], something on current affairs, or a book on a completely unrelated topic[4], taking the time to gain a different perspective on the world is always[5] worth it.

What have I missed?

I had lots of candidates for this list, and I’m sure that I’ve missed something out that you think should be in there.  That’s what comments are for, so please share your thoughts.


1 GNU Linux.

2 the mythical IT community

3 – I know, it’s not going to be as sexy as security, but go with it.  At least once.

4 – I’m currently going through a big espionage fiction phase.  Which is neither here nor there, but hey.

5 – well, maybe almost always.

Author: Mike Bursell

Long-time Open Source and Linux bod, distributed systems security, etc.. Now employed by Red Hat.

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