Logs – good or bad for Confidential Computing?

I wrote a simple workload for testing. It didn’t work.

A few weeks ago, we had a conversation on one of the Enarx calls about logging. We’re at the stage now (excitingly!) where people can write applications and run them using Enarx, in an unprotected Keep, or in an SEV or SGX Keep. This is great, and almost as soon as we got to this stage, I wrote a simple workload to test it all.

It didn’t work.

This is to be expected. First, I’m really not that good a software engineer, but also, software is buggy, and this was our very first release. Everyone expects bugs, and it appeared that I’d found one. My problem was tracing where the issue lay, and whether it was in my code, or the Enarx code. I was able to rule out some possibilities by trying the application in an unprotected (“plain KVM”) Keep, and I also discovered that it ran under SEV, but not SGX. It seemed, then, that the problem might be SGX-specific. But what could I do to look any closer? Well, with very little logging available from within a Keep, there was little I could do.

Which is good. And bad.

It’s good because one of the major points about using Confidential Computing (Enarx is a Confidential Computing framework) is that you don’t want to leak information to untrusted parties. Since logs and error messages can leak lots and lots of information, you want to restrict what’s made available, and to whom. Safe operation dictates that you should make as little information available as you possibly can: preferably none.

It’s bad because there are times when (like me) you need to work out what’s gone wrong, and find out whether it’s in your code or the environment that you’re running your application in.

This is where the conversation about logging came in. We’d started talking about it before this issue came up, but this made me realise how important it was. I started writing a short blog post about it, and then stopped when I realised that there are some really complex issues to consider. That’s why this article doesn’t go into them in depth: you can find a much more detailed discussion over on the Enarx blog. But I’m not going to leave you hanging: below, you’ll find the final paragraph of the Enarx blog article. I hope it piques your interest enough to go and find out more.

In a standard cloud deployment, there is little incentive to consider strong security controls around logging and debugging, simply because the host has access not only to all communications to and from a hosted workload, but also to all the code and data associated with the workload at runtime.  For Confidential Computing workloads, the situation is very different, and designers and architects of the TEE infrastructure (e.g. the Enarx projects) and even, to a lesser extent, of potential workloads themselves, need to consider very carefully the impact of host gaining access to messages associated with the workload and the infrastructure components.  It is, realistically, infeasible to restrict all communication to levels appropriate for deployment, so it is recommended that various profiles are created which can be applied to different stages of a deployment, and whose use is carefully monitored, logged (!) and controlled by process.


Header image by philm1310 from Pixabay.

Author: Mike Bursell

Long-time Open Source and Linux bod, distributed systems security, etc.. Now employed by Red Hat. マイク・バーゼル: オープンソースとLinuxに長く従事。他にも分散セキュリティシステムなども手がける。現在Red Hatのチーフセキュリティアーキテクト

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