Cloud security asymmetry

We in the security world have to make people understand this issue.

My book, Trust in Computer Systems and the Cloud, is due out in the next few weeks, and I was wondering as I walked the dogs today (a key part of the day for thinking!) what the most important message in the book is. I did a bit of thinking and a bit of searching, and decided that the following two paragraphs expose the core thesis of the book. I’ll quote them below and then explain briefly why (the long explanation would require me to post most of the book here!). The paragraph is italicised in the book.

A CSP [Cloud Service Provider] can have computational assurances that a tenant’s workloads cannot affect its hosts’ normal operation, but no such computational assurances are available to a tenant that a CSP’s hosts will not affect their workloads’ normal operation.

In other words, the tenant has to rely on commercial relationships for trust establishment, whereas the CSP can rely on both commercial relationships and computational techniques. Worse yet, the tenant has no way to monitor the actions of the CSP and its host machines to establish whether the confidentiality of its workloads has been compromised (though integrity compromise may be detectable in some situations): so even the “trust, but verify” approach is not available to them.”

What does this mean? There is, in cloud computing, a fundamental asymmetry: CSPs can protect themselves from you (their customer), but you can’t protect yourself from them.

Without Confidential Computing – the use of Trusted Execution Environments to protect your workloads – there are no technical measures that you can take which will stop Cloud Service Providers from looking into and/or altering not only your application, but also the data it is processing, storing and transmitting. CSPs can stop you from doing the same to them using standard virtualisation techniques, but those techniques provide you with no protection from a malicious or compromised host, or a malicious or compromised CSP.

I attended a conference recently attended by lots of people whose job it is to manage and process data for their customers. Many of them do so in the public cloud. And a scary number of them did not understand that all of this data is vulnerable, and that the only assurances they have are commercial and process-based.

We in the security world have to make people understand this issue, and realise that if they are looking after our data, they need to find ways to protect it with strong technical controls. These controls are few:

  • architectural: never deploy sensitive data to the public cloud, ever.
  • HSMs: use Hardware Security Modules. These are expensive, difficult to use and don’t scale, but they are appropriate for some sensitive data.
  • Confidential Computing: use Trusted Execution Environments (TEEs) to protect data and applications in use[1].

Given my interest – and my drive to write and publish my book – it will probably come as no surprise that this is something I care about: I’m co-founder of the Enarx Project (an open source Confidential Computing project) and co-founder and CEO of Profian (a start-up based on Enarx). But I’m not alone: the industry is waking up to the issue, and you can find lots more about the subject at the Confidential Computing Consortium‘s website (including a list of members of the consortium). If this matters to you – and if you’re an enterprise company who uses the cloud, it almost certainly already does, or will do so – then please do your research and consider joining as well. And my book is available for pre-order!

Author: Mike Bursell

Long-time Open Source and Linux bod, distributed systems security, etc.. Now employed by Red Hat. マイク・バーゼル: オープンソースとLinuxに長く従事。他にも分散セキュリティシステムなども手がける。現在Red Hatのチーフセキュリティアーキテクト

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