Who gets acknowledged?

Some of the less obvious folks who get a mention in my book, and why

After last week’s post, noting that my book was likely to be delayed, it turns out that it may be available sooner than I’d thought. Those of you in the US should be able to get hold of a copy first – possibly sooner than I do. The rest of the world should have availability soon after. While you’re all waiting for your copy, however, I thought it might be fun for me to reveal a little about the acknowledgements: specifically, some of the less obvious folks who get a mention, and why they get a mention.

So, without further ado, here’s a list of some of them:

  • David Braben – in September 1984, not long after my 14th birthday, the game Elite came out on the BBC micro. I was hooked, playing for as long and as often as I was allowed (which wasn’t as much as I would have liked, as we had no monitor, and I had to hook the BBC up to the family TV). I first had the game on cassette, and then convinced my parents that a (5.25″) floppy drive would be a good educational investment for me, thereby giving me the ability to play the extended (and much quicker loading) version of the game. Fast forward to now, and I’m still playing the game which, though it has changed and expanded in many ways, is still recognisably the same one that came out 37 years ago. David Braben was the initial author, and still runs the company (Frontier Developments) which creates, runs and supports the game. Elite excited me, back in the 80s, with what computers could do, leading me to look into wireframes, animation and graphics.
  • Richard D’Silva – Richard was the “head of computers” at the school I attended from 1984-1989. He encouraged me (and many others) to learn what computers could do, all the way up to learning Pascal and Assembly language to supplement the (excellent) BASIC available BBC Bs and BBC Masters which the school had (and, latterly, some RISC machines). There was a basic network, too, an “Econet”, and this brought me to initial research into security – mainly as a few of us tried (generally unsuccessfully) to access machines and accounts were weren’t supposed to.
  • William Gibson – Gibson wrote Neuromancer – and then many other novels (and short stories) – in the cyberpunk genre. His vision of engagement with technology – always flawed, often leading to disaster, has yielded some of the most exciting and memorable situations and characters in scifi (Molly, we love you!).
  • Nick Harkaway – I met Nick Cornwell (who writes as Nick Harkaway) at the university Jiu Jitsu club, but he became a firm friend beyond that. Always a little wacky, interested maybe more about the social impacts of technology than tech for tech’s sake (more my style then), he always had lots of interesting opinions to share. When he started writing, his wackiness and thoughtfulness around how technology shapes us informed his fiction (and non-fiction). If you haven’t read The Gone-Away World, order it now (and read it after you’ve finished my book!).
  • Anne McCaffrey – while I’m not an enormous fan of fantasy fiction (and why do scifi and fantasy always seem to be combined in the same section in bookshops?), Anne McCaffrey’s work was a staple in my teenage years. I devoured her DragonRiders of Pern series and also enjoyed her (scifi) Talents series as that emerged. One of the defining characteristics of her books was always strong female characters – a refreshing change for a genre which, at the time, seemed dominated by male protagonists. McCaffrey also got me writing fiction – at one point, my school report in English advised that “Michael has probably written enough science fiction for now”.
  • Mrs Macquarrie (Jenny) – Mrs Macquarrie was my Maths teacher from around 1978-1984. She was a redoubtable Scot, known to the wider world as wife of the eminent theologian John Macquarrie, but, in the universe of the boarding school I attended, she was the strict but fair teacher who not only gave me a good underpinning in Maths, but also provided a “computer club” at the weekends (for those of us who were boarding), with her ZX Spectrum.
  • Sid Meier – I’ve played most of the “Sid Meier’s Civilization” (sic) series of games over the past several decades(!) from the first, released in 1991. In my university years, there would be late night sessions with a bunch of us grouped around the monitor, eating snacks and drinking whatever we could afford. These days, having a game running on a different monitor can still be rewarding when there’s a boring meeting you have to attend…
  • Bishop Nick – this one is a trick, and shouldn’t really appear in this section, as Bishop Nick isn’t a person, but a local brewery. They brew some great beers, however, including “Heresy” and “Divine”. Strongly recommended if you’re in the Northeast Essex/West Suffolk area.
  • Melissa Scott – Scott’s work probably took the place of McCaffrey’s as my reading tastes matured. Night Sky Mine, Trouble and her Friends and The Jazz provided complex and nuanced futures, again with strong female protagonists. The queer undercurrents in her books – most if not all of her books have some connection with queer themes and cultures – were for me introduction to a different viewpoint on writing and sexuality in “popular” fiction, beyond the more obvious and “worthy” literary treatments with which I was already fairly familiar.
  • Neal Stephenson – Nick Harkaway/Cornwell (see above) introduced me to Snowcrash when it first came out, and I managed to get a UK trade paperback copy. Stephenson’s view of a cyberpunk future, different from Gibson’s and full of linguistic and cultural craziness, hooked me, and I’ve devoured all of his work since. You can’t lose with Snowcrash, but my other favourite of his is Cryptonomicon, a book which zig-zags between present day (well, early 2000s, probably) and the Second World War, embracing cryptography, religion, computing, gold, civil engineering and start-up culture. It’s on the list of books I suggest for anyone considering getting into security because the mindset shown by a couple of the characters really nails what it’s all about.

There are more people mentioned, but these are the ones most far removed either in time from or direct relevance to the writing of the book. I’ll leave those more directly involved, or just a little more random, for you to discover as you read.

Don’t forget: if you follow this blog, you’re in for a chance to win a free copy of the Trust in Computer Systems and the Cloud!

Author: Mike Bursell

Long-time Open Source and Linux bod, distributed systems security, etc.. CEO of Profian. マイク・バーゼル: オープンソースとLinuxに長く従事。他にも分散セキュリティシステムなども手がける。現在Profianのチーフセキュリティアーキテクト

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