Trust book – playlist!

A playlist of music to which I’d listened and which I’d enjoyed over the months it took to write the book.

I had probably more fun than I deserved to have writing the acknowledgements section of my book, Trust in Computer Systems and the Cloud (published by Wiley at the end of December 2021). There was another section which I decided to add to the book purely for fun: a playlist of music to which I’d listened and which I’d enjoyed over the months it took to write. I listen to a lot of music, and the list is very far from a complete one, but it does represent a fair cross-section of my general listening tastes. Here’s the list, with a few words about each one.

One thing that’s missing is any of the classical music that I listen to. I decided against including this, as I’d rarely choose single tracks, but adding full albums seemed to miss the point. I do listen to lots of classical music, in particular sacred choral and organ music – happy to let people have some suggestions if they’d like.

  • Secret Messages – ELO – I just had to have something related (or that could be considered to be related) to cryptography and security. This song isn’t, really, but it’s a good song, and I like it.
  • Bleed to Love Her – Fleetwood Mac – Choosing just one Fleetwood Mac song was a challenge, but I settled on this one. I particularly like the harmonics in the version recorded live at Warner Brothers Studio in Burbank.
  • Alone in Kyoto – Air – This is a song that I put on when I want to relax. Chiiiiilllll.
  • She’s So Lovely – Scouting for Girls – Canonically, this song is known as “She’s A Lovely” in our family, as that’s what we discovered our daughters singing along to when we played it in the car many years ago.
  • Prime – Shearwater – This is much more of an “up” song when I want to get an edge on. Shearwater have a broad range of output, but this is particular favourite.
  • Stay – Gabrielle Aplin – I like the way this song flips expectations on its head. A great song by a talented artist.
  • The Way I Feel – Keane – A song about mental health.
  • Come On, Dreamer – Tom Adams – Adams has an amazing voice, and this is a haunting song about hope.
  • Congregation – Low – I discovered this song watching DEVS on Amazon Prime (it was originally on Hulu). Low write (and perform) some astonishing songs, and it’s really worth going through their discography if you like this one.
  • Go! – Public Service Broadcasting – You either love this or hate it, but I’m in the “love” camp. It takes original audio from the Apollo 11 moon landing and puts it to energising, exciting music.
  • The Son of Flynn (From “TRON: Legacy”/Score) – Daft Punk – TRON:Legacy may not be not the best film ever released, but the soundtrack from Daft Punk is outstanding Electronica.
  • Lilo – The Japanese House – A song about loss? About hope? Another one to chill to (and tha band are great live, too).
  • Scooby Snacks – Fun Lovin’ Criminals – Warning: explicit lyrics (from the very beginning!) A ridiculous song which makes me smile every time I listen to it.
  • My Own Worth Enemy – Stereophonics – I slightly surprised myself by choosing this song from the Stereophonics, as I love so many of their songs, but it really does represent much of what I love about their oeuvre.
  • All Night – Parov Stelar – If you ever needed a song to dance to as if nobody’s watching, this is the one.
  • Long Tall Sally (The Thing) – Little Richard – Sometimes you need some classic Rock ‘n’ Roll in your life, and who better to provide it?
  • Shart Dressed Man – ZZ Top – “Black tie…” An all-time classic by men with beards. Mostly.
  • Dueling Banjos – Eric Weissberg – I first heard this song at university. It still calls out to me. There are some good versions out there, but original from the songtrack to Deliverance is the canonical one. And what a film.
  • The Starship Avalon (Main Title) – Thomas Newman – This (with some of the others above) is on a playlist I have called “Architecting”, designed to get me in the zone. Another great film.
  • A Change is Gonna Come – Sam Cooke – A song of sadness, pain and hope.
  • This Place – Jamie Webster – A song about Liverpool, and a family favourite. Listen and enjoy (the accent and the song!).

If you’d like to listen to these tracks yourself, I’ve made playlists on my two preferred audio streaming sites: I hope you enjoy.

Spotify – Trust in Computer Systems and the Cloud – Bursell

Qobuz – Trust in Computer Systems and the Cloud – Bursell

As always, I love to get feedback from readers – do let me know what you think, or suggest other tracks or artists I or other readers might appreciate.

10(+1) plans for 2022

I’m not a big fan of New Year’s resolutions, as I don’t like to set myself up to fail.

This week’s song: Bleed to Love Her by Fleetwood Mac.

I’m not a big fan of New Year’s resolutions, as I don’t like to set myself up to fail. Instead, here are a few things – professional and personal – that I hope or expect to be doing this year. Call them resolutions if you want, but words have power, and I’m avoiding the opportunity

  1. Spend lots of time shepherding Enarx to greater maturity. At Profian, we see our future as closely ties to that of Enarx, and we’ll be growing the project’s capabilities and functionality significantly over this year. Keep an eye out for announcements!
  2. Get fit(ter) again. Yeah, that.
  3. Promote my book. I’m really proud of my book Trust in Computer Systems and the Cloud, which was published right at the end of the year. It aims to raise the standard of knowledge within the industry by proposing a framework for discussion, and I want to make that happen.
  4. Start travelling again. I miss conferences, I miss seeing colleagues, I miss meeting new people. Hopefully it’s going to be easier and safer to travel this year.
  5. Delegate better (and more). As the CEO of a startup, there’s lots I need to make happen. I’m not always the best person actually to be doing it all, and learning to help other people take some (more!) of it over is actually really important not just dot me, but for the business.
  6. Drink lots of tea. No real change here.
  7. Drjnk good whisky. In moderation.
  8. Keep gaming. Possibly a weird one, but gaming is an important downtime activity for me, and helps me relax.
  9. Make the most of music. I listen to lots of music whilst working, travelling, driving, relaxing, etc.. Watch out for a link to the playlist associated with my book – I also plan to list a song or track a week on my blog (see the top of this article for this week’s offering!).
  10. Enjoy reading. One of the benefits of having completed the book is that I now have more time to read; more specifically, more time when I don’t feel guilty that I’m reading rather than doing book-work.
  11. A bonus one: spend more time over at Opensource.com. I’m a Correspondent over there, and enjoy both writing for them and reading other people’s contributions. A great way to get into – or keep up-to-date with – the open source community.

So – not the most inspiring list, but if I can manage most of these this year, I’ll be happy.

“Trust in Computer Systems and the Cloud” published

I’ll probably have a glass or two of something tonight.

It’s official: my book is now published and available in the US! What’s more, my author copies have arrived, so I’ve actually got physical copies that I can hold in my hand.

You can buy the book at Wiley’s site here, and pre-order with Amazon (the US site lists is as “currently unavailable”, and the UK site lists is as available from 22nd Feb, 2022. ,though hopefully it’ll be a little earlier than that). Other bookstores are also stocking it.

I’m over the moon: it’s been a long slog, and I’d like to acknowledge not only those I mentioned in last week’s post (Who gets acknowledged?), but everybody else. Particularly, at this point, everyone at Wiley, calling out specifically Jim Minatel, my commissioning editor. I’m currently basking in the glow of something completed before getting back to my actual job, as CEO of Profian. I’ll probably have a glass or two of something tonight. In the meantime, here’s a quote from Bruce Schneier to get you thinking about reading the book.

Trust is a complex and important concept in network security. Bursell neatly unpacks it in this detailed and readable book.

Bruce Schneier, author of Liars and Outliers: Enabling the Trust that Society Needs to Thrive

At least you know what to buy your techy friends for Christmas!

Who gets acknowledged?

Some of the less obvious folks who get a mention in my book, and why

After last week’s post, noting that my book was likely to be delayed, it turns out that it may be available sooner than I’d thought. Those of you in the US should be able to get hold of a copy first – possibly sooner than I do. The rest of the world should have availability soon after. While you’re all waiting for your copy, however, I thought it might be fun for me to reveal a little about the acknowledgements: specifically, some of the less obvious folks who get a mention, and why they get a mention.

So, without further ado, here’s a list of some of them:

  • David Braben – in September 1984, not long after my 14th birthday, the game Elite came out on the BBC micro. I was hooked, playing for as long and as often as I was allowed (which wasn’t as much as I would have liked, as we had no monitor, and I had to hook the BBC up to the family TV). I first had the game on cassette, and then convinced my parents that a (5.25″) floppy drive would be a good educational investment for me, thereby giving me the ability to play the extended (and much quicker loading) version of the game. Fast forward to now, and I’m still playing the game which, though it has changed and expanded in many ways, is still recognisably the same one that came out 37 years ago. David Braben was the initial author, and still runs the company (Frontier Developments) which creates, runs and supports the game. Elite excited me, back in the 80s, with what computers could do, leading me to look into wireframes, animation and graphics.
  • Richard D’Silva – Richard was the “head of computers” at the school I attended from 1984-1989. He encouraged me (and many others) to learn what computers could do, all the way up to learning Pascal and Assembly language to supplement the (excellent) BASIC available BBC Bs and BBC Masters which the school had (and, latterly, some RISC machines). There was a basic network, too, an “Econet”, and this brought me to initial research into security – mainly as a few of us tried (generally unsuccessfully) to access machines and accounts were weren’t supposed to.
  • William Gibson – Gibson wrote Neuromancer – and then many other novels (and short stories) – in the cyberpunk genre. His vision of engagement with technology – always flawed, often leading to disaster, has yielded some of the most exciting and memorable situations and characters in scifi (Molly, we love you!).
  • Nick Harkaway – I met Nick Cornwell (who writes as Nick Harkaway) at the university Jiu Jitsu club, but he became a firm friend beyond that. Always a little wacky, interested maybe more about the social impacts of technology than tech for tech’s sake (more my style then), he always had lots of interesting opinions to share. When he started writing, his wackiness and thoughtfulness around how technology shapes us informed his fiction (and non-fiction). If you haven’t read The Gone-Away World, order it now (and read it after you’ve finished my book!).
  • Anne McCaffrey – while I’m not an enormous fan of fantasy fiction (and why do scifi and fantasy always seem to be combined in the same section in bookshops?), Anne McCaffrey’s work was a staple in my teenage years. I devoured her DragonRiders of Pern series and also enjoyed her (scifi) Talents series as that emerged. One of the defining characteristics of her books was always strong female characters – a refreshing change for a genre which, at the time, seemed dominated by male protagonists. McCaffrey also got me writing fiction – at one point, my school report in English advised that “Michael has probably written enough science fiction for now”.
  • Mrs Macquarrie (Jenny) – Mrs Macquarrie was my Maths teacher from around 1978-1984. She was a redoubtable Scot, known to the wider world as wife of the eminent theologian John Macquarrie, but, in the universe of the boarding school I attended, she was the strict but fair teacher who not only gave me a good underpinning in Maths, but also provided a “computer club” at the weekends (for those of us who were boarding), with her ZX Spectrum.
  • Sid Meier – I’ve played most of the “Sid Meier’s Civilization” (sic) series of games over the past several decades(!) from the first, released in 1991. In my university years, there would be late night sessions with a bunch of us grouped around the monitor, eating snacks and drinking whatever we could afford. These days, having a game running on a different monitor can still be rewarding when there’s a boring meeting you have to attend…
  • Bishop Nick – this one is a trick, and shouldn’t really appear in this section, as Bishop Nick isn’t a person, but a local brewery. They brew some great beers, however, including “Heresy” and “Divine”. Strongly recommended if you’re in the Northeast Essex/West Suffolk area.
  • Melissa Scott – Scott’s work probably took the place of McCaffrey’s as my reading tastes matured. Night Sky Mine, Trouble and her Friends and The Jazz provided complex and nuanced futures, again with strong female protagonists. The queer undercurrents in her books – most if not all of her books have some connection with queer themes and cultures – were for me introduction to a different viewpoint on writing and sexuality in “popular” fiction, beyond the more obvious and “worthy” literary treatments with which I was already fairly familiar.
  • Neal Stephenson – Nick Harkaway/Cornwell (see above) introduced me to Snowcrash when it first came out, and I managed to get a UK trade paperback copy. Stephenson’s view of a cyberpunk future, different from Gibson’s and full of linguistic and cultural craziness, hooked me, and I’ve devoured all of his work since. You can’t lose with Snowcrash, but my other favourite of his is Cryptonomicon, a book which zig-zags between present day (well, early 2000s, probably) and the Second World War, embracing cryptography, religion, computing, gold, civil engineering and start-up culture. It’s on the list of books I suggest for anyone considering getting into security because the mindset shown by a couple of the characters really nails what it’s all about.

There are more people mentioned, but these are the ones most far removed either in time from or direct relevance to the writing of the book. I’ll leave those more directly involved, or just a little more random, for you to discover as you read.

Don’t forget: if you follow this blog, you’re in for a chance to win a free copy of the Trust in Computer Systems and the Cloud!

Book delay

(You can still win a free copy)

I’m sorry to have to announce that the availability of my book, Trust in Computrer Systems and the Cloud, is likely to be delayed. Wiley, my publisher, had hoped to get copies in the US for early December, and to Europe a month or so after that, but problems getting hold of paper (a core component of physical books, for the uninitiated) mean that these dates will be delayed.

I’m obviously disappointed about this, but it’s really not Wiley’s fault (the paper shortage is wide-spread across the US, it appears). Travel rules permitting, I intend to attend the RSA Conference in San Francisco in February 2022, and we hope to have copies of the book available there (book your signed copy now[1]).

Anyway, sorry to announce this, but it does give you more time to follow this blog, giving you a chance of a free copy when they are available.


1 – I will, actually, sign[2] your copy if you like: do feel free to contact me!

2 – I’m hoping we don’t get to the stage where, as in the film[3] Notting Hill, unsigned copies are worth more than signed ones!

3 – yeah, yeah, “movie” if you must.

Image by Peggychoucair from Pixabay

Win a copy of my book!

What’s better than excerpts? That’s right: the entire book.

As regular readers of this blog will know, I’ve got a book coming out with Wiley soon. It’s called “Trust in Computer Systems and the Cloud”, and the publisher’s blurb is available here. We’ve now got to the stage where we’ve completed not only the proof-reading for the main text, but also the front matter (acknowledgements, dedication, stuff like that), cover and “praise page”. I’d not heard the term before, but it’s where endorsements of the book go, and I’m very, very excited by the extremely kind comments from a variety of industry leaders which you’ll find quoted there and, in some cases, on the cover. You can find a copy of the cover (without endorsement) below.

Trust book front cover (without endorsement)

I’ve spent a lot of time on this book, and I’ve written a few articles about it, including providing a chapter index and summary to let you get a good idea of what it’s about. More than that, some of the articles here actually contain edited excerpts from the book.

What’s better than excerpts, though? That’s right: the entire book. Instead of an article today, however, I’m offering the opportunity to win a copy of the book. All you need to do is follow this blog (with email updates, as otherwise I can’t contact you), and when it’s published (soon, we hope – the March date should be beaten), I’ll choose one lucky follower to receive a copy.

No Wiley employees, please, but other than that, go for it, and I’ll endeavour to get you a copy as soon as I have any available. I’ll try to get it to you pretty much anywhere in the world, as well. So far, it’s only available in English, so apologies if you were hoping for an immediate copy in another language (hint: let me know, and I’ll lobby my publisher for a translation!).

Trust book – chapter index and summary

I thought it might be interesting to provide the chapter index and a brief summary of each chapter addresses.

In a previous article, I presented the publisher’s blurb for my upcoming book with Wiley, Trust in Computer Systems and the Cloud. I thought it might be interesting, this time around, to provide the chapter index of the book and to give a brief summary of what each chapter addresses.

While it’s possible to read many of the chapters on their own, I haved tried to maintain a logical progression of thought through the book, building on earlier concepts to provide a framework that can be used in the real world. It’s worth noting that the book is not about how humans trust – or don’t trust – computers (there’s a wealth of literature around this topic), but about how to consider the issue of trust between computing systems, or what we can say about assurances that computing systems can make, or can be made about them. This may sound complex, and it is – which is pretty much why I decided to write the book in the first place!

  • Introduction
    • Why I think this is important, and how I came to the subject.
  • Chapter 1 – Why Trust?
    • Trust as a concept, and why it’s important to security, organisations and risk management.
  • Chapter 2 – Humans and Trust
    • Though the book is really about computing and trust, and not humans and trust, we need a grounding in how trust is considered, defined and talked about within the human realm if we are to look at it in our context.
  • Chapter 3 – Trust Operations and Alternatives
    • What are the main things you might want to do around trust, how can we think about them, and what tools/operations are available to us?
  • Chapter 4 – Defining Trust in Computing
    • In this chapter, we delve into the factors which are specific to trust in computing, comparing and contrasting them with the concepts in chapter 2 and looking at what we can and can’t take from the human world of trust.
  • Chapter 5 – The Importance of Systems
    • Regular readers of this blog will be unsurprised that I’m interested in systems. This chapter examines why systems are important in computing and why we need to understand them before we can talk in detail about trust.
  • Chapter 6 – Blockchain and Trust
    • This was initially not a separate chapter, but is an important – and often misunderstood or misrepresented – topic. Blockchains don’t exist or operate in a logical or computational vacuum, and this chapter looks at how trust is important to understanding how blockchains work (or don’t) in the real world.
  • Chapter 7 – The Importance of Time
    • One of the important concepts introduced earlier in the book is the consideration of different contexts for trust, and none is more important to understand than time.
  • Chapter 8 – Systems and Trust
    • Having introduced the importance of systems in chapter 5, we move to considering what it means to have establish a trust relationship from or to a system, and how the extent of what is considered part of the system is vital.
  • Chapter 9 – Open Source and Trust
    • Another topc whose inclusion is unlikely to surprise regular readers of this blog, this chapter looks at various aspects of open source and how it relates to trust.
  • Chapter 10 – Trust, the Cloud, and the Edge
    • Definitely a core chapter in the book, this addresses the complexities of trust in the modern computing environments of the public (and private) cloud and Edge networks.
  • Chapter 11 – Hardware, Trust, and Confidential Computing
    • Confidential Computing is a growing and important area within computing, but to understand its strengths and weaknesses, there needs to be a solid theoretical underpinning of how to talk about trust. This chapter also covers areas such as TPMs and HSMs.
  • Chapter 12 – Trust Domains
    • Trust domains are a concept that allow us to apply the lessons and frameworks we have discussed through the book to real-world situations at large scale. They also allow for modelling at the business level and for issues like risk management – introduced at the beginning of the book – to be considered more explicitly.
  • Chapter 13 – A World of Explicit Trust
    • Final musings on what a trust-centric (or at least trust-inclusive) view of the world enables and hopes for future work in the field.
  • References
    • List of works cited within the book.

Trust book preview

What it means to trust in the context of computer and network security

Just over two years ago, I agreed a contract with Wiley to write a book about trust in computing. It was a long road to get there, starting over twenty years ago, but what pushed me to commit to writing something was a conference I’d been to earlier in 2019 where there was quite a lot of discussion around “trust”, but no obvious underlying agreement about what was actually meant by the term. “Zero trust”, “trusted systems”, “trusted boot”, “trusted compute base” – all terms referencing trust, but with varying levels of definition, and differing understanding if what was being expected, by what components, and to what end.

I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about trust over my career and also have a major professional interest in security and cloud computing, specifically around Confidential Computing (see Confidential computing – the new HTTPS? and Enarx for everyone (a quest) for some starting points), and although the idea of a book wasn’t a simple one, I decided to go for it. This week, we should have the copy-editing stage complete (technical editing already done), with the final stage being proof-reading. This means that the book is close to down. I can’t share a definitive publication date yet, but things are getting there, and I’ve just discovered that the publisher’s blurb has made it onto Amazon. Here, then, is what you can expect.


Learn to analyze and measure risk by exploring the nature of trust and its application to cybersecurity 

Trust in Computer Systems and the Cloud delivers an insightful and practical new take on what it means to trust in the context of computer and network security and the impact on the emerging field of Confidential Computing. Author Mike Bursell’s experience, ranging from Chief Security Architect at Red Hat to CEO at a Confidential Computing start-up grounds the reader in fundamental concepts of trust and related ideas before discussing the more sophisticated applications of these concepts to various areas in computing. 

The book demonstrates in the importance of understanding and quantifying risk and draws on the social and computer sciences to explain hardware and software security, complex systems, and open source communities. It takes a detailed look at the impact of Confidential Computing on security, trust and risk and also describes the emerging concept of trust domains, which provide an alternative to standard layered security. 

  • Foundational definitions of trust from sociology and other social sciences, how they evolved, and what modern concepts of trust mean to computer professionals 
  • A comprehensive examination of the importance of systems, from open-source communities to HSMs, TPMs, and Confidential Computing with TEEs. 
  • A thorough exploration of trust domains, including explorations of communities of practice, the centralization of control and policies, and monitoring 

Perfect for security architects at the CISSP level or higher, Trust in Computer Systems and the Cloud is also an indispensable addition to the libraries of system architects, security system engineers, and master’s students in software architecture and security. 

7 tips on how not to write a book

If you’re in the unenviable position of having to write a book: read this.

Just before Christmas – about 6 months ago, it feels like – I published a blog post to announce that I’d finished writing my book: Trust in Computing and the Cloud. I’ve spent much of the time since then in shock that I managed it – and feeling smug that I delivered the text to Wiley some 4-5 months before my deadline. As well as the core text of the book, I’ve created diagrams (which I expect to be redrawn by someone with actual skills), compiled a bibliography, put together an introduction, written a dedication and rustled up a set of acknowledgements. I even added a playlist of some of the tracks to which I’ve listened while writing it all. The final piece of text that the publisher is expecting is, I believe, a biography – I’m waiting to hear what they’d like it to look like.

All that said, I’m aware that the process is far from over: there is going to be lots of editing to be done, from checking my writing to correcting glaring technical errors. There’s an index to be created (thankfully this is not my job – it’s a surprisingly complex task best carried out those with skill and experience in the task), renaming of some chapters and sections, decisions on design issues like cover design (I hope to have some input, but don’t expect to be the final arbiter – I know my limits[1]). And then there’s the actual production process – in which I don’t expect to be particularly involved – followed by publicity and, well, selling copies. After which comes the inevitable fame, fortune and beach house in Malibu[2]. So, there’s lots more to do: I also expect to create a website to go with the book – I’ll work with my publisher on this closer to the time.

Having spent over a year writing a book (and having written a few fiction works which nobody seemed that interested in taking up), I’m still not entirely sure how I managed it, so instead of doing the obvious “how to write a book” article, I thought I’d provide an alternative, which I feel fairly well qualified to produce: how not to write a book. I’m going to assume that, for whatever reason, you are expected to write a book, but that you want to make sure that you avoid doing so, or, if you have to do it, that you’ll make the worst fist of it possible: a worthy goal. If you’re in the unenviable position of having to write a book: read this.

1. Avoid passion

If you don’t care about your subject, you’re on good ground. You’ll have little incentive to get your head into the right space for writing, because well, meh. If you’re not passionate about the subject, then actually buckling down and writing the text of the book probably won’t happen, and if, somehow, a book does get written, then it’s likely that any readers who pick it up will fast realise that the turgid, disinterested style[3] you have adopted reflects your ennui with the topic and won’t get much further than the first few pages. Your publisher won’t ask you to produce a second edition: you’re safe.

2. Don’t tell your family

I mean, they’ll probably notice anyway, but don’t tell them before you start, and certainly don’t attempt to get their support and understanding. Failing to write a book is going to be much easier if your nearest and dearest barge into your workspace demanding that you perform tasks like washing up, tidying, checking their homework, going shopping, fixing the Internet or “speaking to the children about their behaviour because I’ve had enough of the little darlings and if you don’t come out of your office right now and take over some of the childcare so that I can have that gin I’ve been promising myself, then I’m not going to be responsible for my actions, so help me.”[4]

3. Assume you know everything already

There’s a good chance that the book you’re writing is on a topic about which you know a fair amount. If this is the case, and you’re a bit of an expert, then there’s a danger that you’ll realise that you don’t know everything about the subject: there’s a famous theory[5] that those who are inexpert think they know more than they do, whereas those who are expert may actually believe they are less expert than they are. Going by this theory, if you don’t realise that you’re inexpert, then you’re sorted, and won’t try to find more information, but if you’re in the unhappy position of actually knowing what you’re up to, you will need to make an effort to avoid referencing other material, reading around the subject or similar. Just put down what you think about the issue, and assume that your aura of authority and the fact that your words are actually in print will be enough to convince your readers (should you get any).

4. Backups are for wimps

I usually find that when I forget to make a backup of a work and it gets lost through my incompetence, power cuts, cat keyboard interventions and the like, it comes out better when I rewrite it. For this reason, it’s best to avoid taking backups of your book as you produce it. My book came to almost exactly 125,000 words, and if I type at around 80wpm, that’s only 1,500[6] or 60(ish) days of writing. And it’ll be better second time around (see above!), so everybody wins.

5. Write for everyone

Your book is going to be a work of amazing scholarship, but accessible to humanities (arts) and science graduates, school children, liberals, conservatives, an easy read of great gravitas. Even if you’re not passionate about the subject (see 1), then your publisher is keen enough on it to have agreed to publish your book, so there must be a market – and the wider the market, the more they can sell! For that reason, you clearly want to ensure that you don’t try to write for particular audience (lectience?), but change your style chapter by chapter – or, even better, section by section or paragraph by paragraph.

6. Ignore deadlines

Douglas Adams said it best: “I love deadlines. I love the whooshing noise they make as they go by.” Your publisher has deadlines to keep themselves happy, not you. Write when you feel like it – your work is so good (see 5) that it’ll stay relevant whenever it finally gets published. Don’t give in to the tyranny of deadlines – even if you agreed to them previously. You’ll end up missing them anyway as you rewrite the entirety of the book when you lose the text and have no backup (see 4).

7. Expect no further involvement after completion

Once you’re written the book, you’re done, right? You might tell a couple of friends or colleagues, but if you do any publicity for your publisher, or post anything on social media, you’re in danger of it becoming a success and having to produce a second edition (see 1). In fact, you need to put your foot down before you even get to that stage. Once you’ve sent your final text to the publisher, avoid further contact. Your editor will only want you to “revise” or “check” material. This is a waste of your time: you know that what you produced was perfect first time round, so why bother with anything further? Your job was authoring, not editing, revising or checking.


(I should apologise to everyone at Wiley for this post, and in particular the team with whom I’ve been working. You can rest assured that none[7] of these apply to me – or you.)


1 – my wife and family would dispute this. How about “I know some of my limits”?

2 – maybe not, if only because I associate Malibu with a certain rum-based liqueur and ill-advised attempts to appear sophisticated at parties in my youth.

3 – this is not to suggest that authors who are interested in their book’s subject don’t sometimes write in a turgid, disinterested style. I just hope that I’ve managed to avoid it.

4- disclaimer: getting their support doesn’t mean that you won’t have to perform any of these tasks, just that there may be a little more scope for negotiation. For the couple of weeks or so, at least.

5 – I say it’s famous, but I can’t be bothered to look it up or reference it, because I assume that I know enough about the topic already. See? It’s easy when you know.

6 – it’s also worth avoiding accurate figures in technical work: just round in whichever direction you prefer.

7 – well, probably none. Or not all of them, anyway.