Review of CCC members by business interests

Reflections on the different types of member in the Confidential Computing Consortium

This is a brief post looking at the Confidential Computing Consortium (the “CCC”), a Linux Foundation project “to accelerate the adoption of Trusted Execution Environment (TEE) technologies and standards.” First, a triple disclaimer: I’m a co-founder of the Enarx project (a member project of the CCC), an employee of Red Hat (which donated Enarx to the CCC and is a member) and an officer (treasurer) and voting member of two parts of the CCC (the Governing Board and Technical Advisory Committee), and this article represents my personal views, not (necessarily) the views of any of the august organisations of which I am associated.

The CCC was founded in October 2019, and is made up of three different membership types: Premier, General and Associate members. Premier members have a representative who gets a vote on various committees, and General members are represented by elected representatives on the Governing Board (with a representative elected for every 10 General Members). Premier members pay a higher subscription than General Members. Associate membership is for government entities, academic and nonprofit organisations. All members are welcome to all meetings, with the exception of “closed” meetings (which are few and far between, and are intended to deal with issues such as hiring or disciplinary matters). At the time of writing, there are 9 Premier members, 20 General members and 3 Associate members. There’s work underway to create an “End-User Council” to allow interested organisations to discuss their requirements, use cases, etc. with members and influence the work of the consortium “from the outside” to some degree.

The rules of the consortium allow only one organisation from a “group of related companies” to appoint a representative (where they are Premier), with similar controls for General members. This means, for instance, that although Red Hat and IBM are both active within the Consortium, only one (Red Hat) has a representative on the Governing Board. If Nvidia’s acquisition of Arm goes ahead, the CCC will need to decide how to manage similar issues there.

What I really wanted to do in this article, however, was to reflect on the different types of member, not by membership type, but by their business(es). I think it’s interesting to look at various types of business, and to reflect on why the CCC and confidential computing in general are likely to be of interest to them. You’ll notice a number of companies – most notably Huawei and IBM (who I’ve added in addition to Red Hat, as they represent a wide range of business interests between them) – appearing in several of the categories. Another couple of disclaimers: I may be misrepresenting both the businesses of the companies represented and also their interests! This is particularly likely for some of the smaller start-up members with whom I’m less familiar. These are my thoughts, and I apologise for errors: please feel free to contact me with suggestions for corrections.

Cloud Service Providers (CSPs)

Cloud Service Providers are presented with two great opportunities by confidential computing: the ability to provide their customers with greater isolation from other customers’ workloads, and the chance to avoid having to trust the CSP themselves. The first is the easiest to implement, and the one on which the CSPs have so far concentrated, but I hope we’re going to see more of the latter in the future, as regulators (and customers’ CFOs/auditors) realise that deploying to the cloud does not require a complex trust relationship with the operators of the hosts running the workload.

  • Google
  • IBM
  • Microsoft

The most notable missing player in this list is Amazon, whose AWS offering would seem to make them a good fit for the CCC, but who have not joined up to this point.

Silicon vendors

Silicon vendors produce their own chips (or license their designs to other vendors). They are the ones who are providing the hardware technology to allow TEE-based confidential computing. All of the major silicon vendors are respresented in the CCC, though not all of them have existing products in the market. It would be great to see more open source hardware (RISC-V is not represented in the CCC) to increase the trust the users can have in confidential computing, but the move to open source hardware has been slow so far.

  • AMD
  • Arm
  • Huawei
  • IBM
  • Intel
  • Nvidia

Hardware manufacturers

Hardware manufacturers are those who will be putting TEE-enabled silicon in their equipment and providing services based on it. It is not surprising that we have no “commodity” hardware manufacturers represented, but interesting that there are a number of companies who create dedicated or specialist hardware.

  • Cisco
  • Google
  • Huawei
  • IBM
  • Nvidia
  • Western Digital
  • Xilinx

Service companies

In this category I have added companies which provide services of various kinds, rather than acting as ISVs or pure CSPs. We can expect a growing number of service companies to realise the potential of confidential computing as a way of differentiating their products and providing services with interesting new trust models for their customers.

  • Accenture
  • Ant Group
  • Bytedance
  • Facebook
  • Google
  • Huawei
  • IBM
  • Microsoft
  • Red Hat
  • Swisscom

ISVs

There are a number of ISVs (Independent Software Vendors) who are members of the CCC, and this heading is in some ways a “catch-all” for members who don’t necessarily fit cleanly under any of the other headings. There is a distinct subset, however, of blockchain-related companies which I’ve separated out below.

What is particularly interesting about the ISVs represented here is that although the CCC is dedicated to providing open source access to TEE-based confidential computing, most of the companies in this category do not provide open source code, or if they do, do so only for a small part of the offering. Membership of the CCC does not in any way require organisations to open source all of their related software, however, so their membership is not problematic, at least from the point of view of the charter. As a dedicated open source fan, however, I’d love to see more commitment to open source from all members.

  • Anjuna
  • Anqlave
  • Bytedance
  • Cosmian
  • Cysec
  • Decentriq
  • Edgeless Systems
  • Fortanix
  • Google
  • Huawei
  • IBM
  • r3
  • Red Hat
  • VMware

Blockchain

As permissioned blockchains gain traction for enterprise use, it is becoming clear that there are some aspects and components of their operation which require strong security and isolation to allow trust to be built into the operating model. Confidential computing provides ways to provide many of the capabilities required in these contexts, which is why it is unsurprising to see so many blockchain-related companies represented in the CCC.

  • Appliedblockchain
  • Google
  • IBM
  • iExec
  • Microsoft
  • Phala network
  • r3

Author: Mike Bursell

Long-time Open Source and Linux bod, distributed systems security, etc.. Now employed by Red Hat. マイク・バーゼル: オープンソースとLinuxに長く従事。他にも分散セキュリティシステムなども手がける。現在Red Hatのチーフセキュリティアーキテクト

5 thoughts on “Review of CCC members by business interests”

  1. Hi Mike – Richard Brown (CTO of R3 here). This is a really helpful list. Thanks for pulling it together. Is it possible to be really cheeky and ask you to list us in the ‘other’ ISV list too please?! It’s true that Conclave integrates with blockchains such as Corda (and those use-cases are also what motivated us to create it in the first place) and so you’re right to put is in that section. But the product we ultimately released ended up being a standalone platform for the development of confidential computing applications more generally. And, aside from a sample in the docs, there is nothing blockchain- or Corda-specific in Conclave.

    Like

  2. Hi Mike – Richard Brown (CTO of R3 here). This is a really helpful list. Thanks for pulling it together. Is it possible to be really cheeky and ask you to list us in the ‘other’ ISV list too please?! It’s true that Conclave integrates with blockchains such as Corda (and those use-cases are also what motivated us to create it in the first place) and so you’re right to put is in that section. But the product we ultimately released ended up being a standalone platform for the development of confidential computing applications more generally. And, aside from a sample in the docs, there is nothing blockchain- or Corda-specific in Conclave.

    Like

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