A User Advisory Council for the CCC

The CCC is currently working to create a User Advisory Council (UAC)

Disclaimer: the views expressed in this article (and this blog) do not necessarily reflect those of any of the organisations or companies mentioned, including my employer (Red Hat) or the Confidential Computing Consortium.

The Confidential Computing Consortium was officially formed in October 2019, nearly a year and a half ago now. Despite not setting out to be a high membership organisation, nor going out of its way to recruit members, there are, at time of writing, 9 Premier members (of which Red Hat, my employer, is one), 22 General members, and 3 Associate members. You can find a list of each here, and a brief analysis I did of their business interests a few weeks ago in this article: Review of CCC members by business interests.

The CCC has two major committees (beyond the Governing Board):

  • Technical Advisory Board (TAC) – this coordinates all technical areas in which the CCC is involved. It recommends whether software projects should be accepted into the CCC (no hardware projects have been introduced so far, thought it’s possible they might be), coordinates activities like special interest groups (we expect one on Attestation to start very soon), encourages work across projects, manages conversations with other technical bodies, and produces material such as the technical white paper listed here.
  • Outreach Committee – when we started the CCC, we decided against going with the title “Marketing Committee”, as we didn’t think it represented the work we hoped this committee would be doing, and this was a good decision. Though there are activities which might fall under this heading, the work of the Outreach Committee is much wider, including analyst and press relations, creation of other materials, community outreach, cross-project discussions, encouraging community discussions, event planning, webinar series and beyond.

These two committees have served the CCC well, but now that it’s fairly well established, and has a fairly broad industry membership of hardware manufacturers, CSPs, service providers and ISVs (see my other article), we decided that there was one set of interested parties who were not well-represented, and which the current organisational structure did not do a sufficient job of encouraging to get involved: end-users.

It’s all very well the industry doing amazing innovation, coming up with astonishingly well-designed, easy to integrate, security-optimised hardware-software systems for confidential computing if nobody wants to use them. Don’t get me wrong: we know from many conversations with organisations across multiple sectors that users absolutely want to be able to make use of TEEs and confidential computing. That is not that same, however, as understanding their use cases in detail and ensuring that what we – the members of the CCC, who are focussed mainly on creating services and software – actually provide what users need. These users are across many sectors – finance, government, healthcare, pharmaceutical, Edge, to name but a few – and their use cases and requirements are going to be different.

This is why the CCC is currently working to create a User Advisory Council (UAC). The details are being worked out at the moment, but the idea is that potential and existing users of confidential computing technologies should have a forum in which they can connect with the leaders in the space (which hopefully describes the CCC members), share their use cases, find out more about the projects which are part of the CCC, and even take a close look at those projects most relevant to them and their needs. This sort of engagement isn’t likely, on the whole, to require attendance at lots of meetings, or to have frequent input into the sorts of discussions which the TAC and the Outreach Committee typically consider, and the general feeling is that as we (the CCC) are aiming to service these users, we shouldn’t be asking them to pay for the privilege (!) of talking to us. The intention, then, is to allow a low bar for involvement in the UAC, and for there to be no membership fee required. That’s not to stop UAC members from joining the CCC as members if they wish – it would be a great outcome if some felt that they were so keen to become more involved that membership was appropriate – but there should be no expectation of that level of commitment.

I should be clear that the plans for the UAC are not complete yet, and some of the above may change. Nor should you consider this a formal announcement – I’m writing this article because I think it’s interesting, and because I believe that this is a vital next step in how those involved with confidential computing engages with the broader world, not because I represent the CCC in this context. But there’s always a danger that “cool” new technologies develop into something which fits only the fundamentally imaginary needs of technologists (and I’ll put my hand up and say that I’m one of those), rather than the actual needs of businesses and organisations which are struggling to operate around difficult issues in the real world. The User Advisory Council, if it works as we hope, should allow the techies (me, again) to hear from people and organisations about what they want our technologies to do, and to allow the CCC to steer its efforts in these directions.

Author: Mike Bursell

Long-time Open Source and Linux bod, distributed systems security, etc.. Now employed by Red Hat. マイク・バーゼル: オープンソースとLinuxに長く従事。他にも分散セキュリティシステムなども手がける。現在Red Hatのチーフセキュリティアーキテクト

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